October –> November (Goodbye/Hello)

September was my New York City wake up call to start getting involved. After realizing the last concert I had been to was in early December 2014 (Billy Joel at Penn State) I felt like I to start doing something to show I was actually enjoying New York. So, I got to Googling, found some events, and signed myself up. Turns out: you can have a lot of fun here.

October was a whirlwind. It started with a Jon Batiste concert at Webster Hall (first time there!), then a Billy Joel talk/impromptu concert as a part of the New Yorker Festival, then the book launch party for Sara Bareilles (in Brooklyn), and, yes, followed by a concert. I Instagram’ed all of these events, naturally.

I experienced New York Television Festival for the first, but certainly not the last time. It felt weird to volunteer for something, having no clue what I was getting myself into. But every night after work I rushed to the west side, the SVA Theater, and would help set up and run green rooms for people like Dan Harmon, usher people to their seats, and just generally be a good addition to the very small team. The NYTVF has been around for a decade, and has helped numerous people launch their television careers — an annual pilot competition often leads to development deals with studios and networks. I have so many wonderful things to say about NYTVF, that I’m saving it for another blog post.

Moving on through the month, during NYTVF I turned 22. I woke up at 5:30 a.m. on my 22nd birthday and went to a 6am SoulCycle class. We jammed to a remix of Taylor Swift’s ’22′ and the entire class and sang me happy birthday at the end while the SoulCycle instructors brought me a cupcake with a candle in it. Let me tell ya – it’s really interesting to get cupcake at 6:55 in the morning after torching calories in a spinning class.

After learning about the J/HRTS through NYTVF, I signed up and promptly found myself shaking hands with the EVP of U.S. Scripted Programming at Sony Pictures, Kim Rozenfeld, twenty-four hours later. I’ve also committed myself to getting more involved with this society too, so we’ll see where I can go with that.

It’s amazing how different you can feel after just 31 days. I’ve experienced so many different kinds of events and met amazing, incredible people. The summer was nuts, but this month was the one to really revitalize me and the things I want to do. I’m focusing on my passions and the stuff I like for the next few months — starting with NaNoWriMo this month — and it’s proven to make me a happier person and more content with life overall. Who’d thunk?

Maybe I just get bored too quickly

Moving to New York City was always The Plan. I couldn’t get here fast enough. It was — and is — my belief that this stupid little island has everything I could want and more. And anything it doesn’t have, I clearly don’t need. I’ve believed this for the past decade, until now.

People say, if you want to be serious about making television, you have to go to California. I’ve disagreed. I’ve tuned out the naysayers and the professionals who have been in the industry longer than I have been alive. I’m not particularly fond of the West Coast. It’s too far away from my east coast roots, too warm, too weird, too this, too that. When asked what I would do if a television show I ran would set up shop in Vancouver or L.A., my answer is simply “move it to New York.”

I’ve been living here for about nine months now, I’ve experienced every season and just about every emotion you could have. I’ve been to the tallest point in the sky (One World Observatory), have walked dozens of miles, been to countless bars and restaurants, etc. Going into fall, the air crisp and holiday season about to get under way, my affection for New York City is consistently renewed.


I’ve been thinking about the West Coast lot lately. About the studios, production companies, and general qualities of California that do give it an edge over New York.

There’s abundant potential to work my way up the totem pole in a writers room. Writer’s assistant, staff writer, script coordinator, and so on. It is undeniably easier to get my feet wet there than it is over here. But what’s more, I’ve also become more interested in development and programming schedules. There is something about working in development, helping multiple shows launch and succeed, versus working on just one, that gets excited. It makes complete sense given my personality: I like to have my hands in all of the pots. I’m naturally nosey. I like having multiple plates spinning at once.

This past week, I joined the JHRTS (a story for another blog post) and saw the EVP of U.S. Scripted Programming for Sony, Kim Rozenfeld, give a talk. He was incredible and definitely furthered my interest in development and working for a studio. Naturally, when talking about east vs. west coast opportunities, he said something along the lines of “if you’re serious about working in this industry, you’ve got to go out to Hollywood. At least a little while.” He said that, although television production is now global, Hollywood still reigns supreme in terms of job quantity, and quality.

A switch flipped in me. I thought — and think, not even a week later — that, yeah, I could spend some time in L.A. Not next year (my apartment lease doesn’t end until May), but, maybe depending where I am in life, I could reevaluate where I want to go in the summer of 2017.

I still love New York. Living here hasn’t diminished my love for the city much, but it has made me realistically reevaluate what I’m doing here, and where I want to go. The thought of maybe, someday moving to California also made me realize just how serious I am about television production as well, which is something I hadn’t realized before. It’s one thing to say, someday, I want to work in TV. It’s another to put a plan into action and make it happen.

Stay tuned.

October 1

I had been meaning to post this since the beginning of October, which tells you how busy I’ve been. It’s already the 13th (almost the 14th) and I’m acting like it’s the first of the month.

Change is unpleasant. But sometimes it’s necessary. Sometimes, it’s vital in order to make some headway in life. I use to be really bad with change. I still am. But I realize that there are some things I cannot change, and trying to fight against those circumstances is exhausting. It’s easier to accept it and figure out the best way to proceed. You cannot go back into the past and wish events had happened differently, you just end up wasting time and energy that could be better spent moving on. Trying to fix or heal or undo or improve upon the past.

You get knocked down sometimes. You face setbacks. But an arrow needs to be pulled back in order to soar (something like that…). You bounce back stronger than ever.

I’ve got some really exciting events lined up over the next few weeks that remind me why I’m doing this. Why I’m choosing to do and be instead of wait. I’ve been living in the city for seven months now, and I think I’m just starting to appreciate all of the opportunities that are available to me.

In the span of four days earlier this month I was front row for Jon Batiste and Stay Human (the Late Show Starring with Stephen Colbert’s band), then the next night I was a foot away from Billy Joel after his discussion at the New Yorker Festival, and then two days later, I attended Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Sara Barellies’ book launch event. I saw her having an amazing talk with Ben Folds, preform a handful of songs and I was one of the first twenty people to get her book signed.

Coming up next week: the New York Television Festival!

Summer 2015: An update

Let’s all think back to Memorial Day for a second. After a relentlessly cold winter and damp spring, the weather had finally warmed a bit, melting the dirty lingering snow banks around New York City. The air was crisp in the mornings and balmy in the evenings. And, most importantly, we had a summer of possibilities ahead of us.

This summer was interesting and intense for a lot of reasons. It was so incredibly fun and my head is still kind of spinning a little bit from everything that happened, in a really good way. However, once again, the iced coffees have started to give way to extra-hot soy cappuccinos during my morning commute to work. Instead of bracing myself for a suffocating heat during a lunch break, I am pleasantly surprised to walk outside to a nice breeze. The air conditioning doesn’t need to be on full-blast and pumpkin-flavored foods are back on store shelves. My favorite season is here again!

If my schedule for the next month is any indication, this fall will be even busier than this summer was. I think I’m finally embracing the opportunities New York City has been trying to give me for the past eight months. There are events to attend and places to eat and an energy that never lets up. There’s an unexplainable buzz, there’s never a reason to be bored in New York City. If you’re bored, there is a book to pick up from the NYPL, limited-release movie to see in Union Square or some event happening somewhere.


Having survived my first summer living in the city full-time, I will say, it was a whirlwind. The other day I was looking back through my Google Calendar, wondering “what the heck did I do for the past twelve weeks?” Well. I met a lot of great people at the job I started in June, I reconnected with some old friends from Penn State, I saw a lot of great television and movies, read some fantastic books and think pieces online, languished in the long, sunny days by grabbing after-work drinks of rooftop bars, saw the Macy’s fireworks from an incredible water-side spot, tried – and liked! – some great food for the first time, and just generally had a really good time.

For now though, I’ll enjoy the spot on my couch, watching NFL football and later tonight, I’ll watch Andy Samberg host my favorite awards show, the Emmys.

I will say though, I’m already bracing myself for the holiday season and unconscionable influx of tourists that will descend on the city from the moment the Rockefeller Tree goes up to the second the ball drops in Times Square. I’ll just have to avoid central Manhattan at all costs, never venturing west of Lexington. We’ll see how that goes — I am a sucker for all things Tis the Season.

🎄 #soon #fromwhereistand #30rock

A photo posted by Kristina (@krislintz) on

My grandfather, on dieting

My grandfather was a jolly man. It’s the best way I can describe him. He was one of the nicest, most outgoing men I’ve ever known, striking conversations with anyone – families at the park or waiters at a restaurant. He would always take the time to ask people about their life stories. It drove us insane sometimes, when we were in a rush to get to a soccer game (my sister’s) or a basketball game (Maryland’s) or trying to let people go on with our lives, but we always tolerated it because people loved talking with him.

More than a few times, whenever we’d get together for a birthday or holiday dinner, there’d be some time of insane dessert. And while my grandfather was never one to turn down a piece, he always said his diet would start ‘tomorrow.’ One time, I vividly remember him saying “I always say the diet will start tomorrow. But then it’s Thanksgiving, and you can’t turn down pie on Thanksgiving. Then it’s someones birthday, and it’s rude to not eat a piece of cake on someone’s birthday. There’s always another reason to eat dessert and to push off dieting until tomorrow, and suddenly before you know it, a year’s gone by and you never started!”

It’s silly, but I’ve thought about that a lot over the years. He passed away in 2009, buried in Arlington thanks to his time spent in the Navy and service to our country (his attempts to teach me morse code were futile, no matter how many times he’d sound out my name for me). Whenever there’s dessert, no matter how healthy I’m trying to be, I always think of him, and say ‘the diet can start tomorrow.’

Happy Memorial Day

The Precarious Relationship between ‘Video Technology’ and Advertising

An interesting article popped up in front of the WSJ paywall earlier this week about television and digital content. Imagine my surprise and utter delight when I realized Linda Yaccarino was the author of it. As president of Ad Sales for all of NBCUniversal, she not only has a busy few weeks ahead of her (Upfronts!!!), she also is a Penn State alum (We are!) and has been one of my professional idols for a few years now.

As one of the leaders of the television advertising industry, she has a front-row seat to the developments and changes that have happened upon consumer’s television consumption and watching habits, making her a bit of an expert on the matter at hand: consumers, their viewing habits, and how it’s changed the television landscape. In her article, she proposes the interesting theory that TV has become VT – “video technology.”

What that means, essentially, is that your TV is just another device for you to plug into. Just another device for you to use as to watch content on a streaming platform. I’m even hesitant to call it ‘watching television shows.’ Because what is the definition of a ‘television show’?

What differentiates ‘television’ like New Girl from a ‘Hulu show’ like Resident Advisors. Are they both TV? Or are they, as Yaccarino proposes, all ‘video content’? But, regardless of all this, there is one necessary constant: advertising.

The entire ecosystem of television and digital platforms has been built on the mutual relationship between advertisers and content creators (whether that be network studios or Grace Helbig on YouTube). The latter need money and have people watching, the former have the money and need people watching to buy into whatever product, service or idea they’re selling.

She says that “VT” is the “future of our industry” and she is able to distill the complex idea/debate in to a 600-word article. Basically, it’s much better than any way I could articulate the ideas within the post. I get excited and start rambling on tangents about Nielsen measurement and content creation.

Definitely check out the whole article, Outside Voices: In Defense of TV – It’s Actually ‘VT’

We know there are a few certainties in life: death, taxes and my loyalty to NBC. What or how NBC chooses to reinvent itself next as, you can bet I’ll be ready to jump on board.

Thinking about it now, this transition from television to online platforms doesn’t really feel that different than decades ago, when NBC, CBS and ABC were radio stations. People crowded around a radio in their living rooms to listen. Then they huddled around a television set to watch. Now they’re everywhere. On trains and airplanes, lying in bed and killing time in a café, watching on multiple screens. It certainly is a far cry from ‘the good ole days.’

Looking Ahead At May

Hard to believe I’ve been meaning to post this last Friday on May 1st, but here we are on the Cinco de Mayo. Hope you all are enjoying your margaritas and guacamole and chips. I have to get up at 5:30am for my 6:10am Pure Barre class that I have booked for tomorrow (and Thursday and Friday).

Flowers in full bloom at Madison Square Park!

Flowers in full bloom at Madison Square Park!

May always feels like such a transition month to me — both literally and metaphorically. It’s usually when I’m out of school for three months and scrambling to find an internship to fill the summer – thankfully, I always found the perfect internship for me. This May is a little bit similar, but very different. With that, comes some goals and aspirations that I have for the next 25 days.

This month, my goals are to get refocused on endeavors like this website (aren’t I always looking to do that?), recommit myself to Hypable and prepare to start a new chapter and job on June 1st. There is a lot to look forward to this summer, and I’m glad May is finally here to kick off the festivities.

I’ve been having such a great time in New York City these past three months, but it’s been cold, and the energy around town has be low, to say the least. Now that it looks like spring/summer is here to stay, people have definitely perked up. Some leg (even my very pasty-white ones) is being shown, iced coffees now cool our hands while the back of our necks start to prickle with sweat from the steam that rises from the street.

I leave you with a quad-shot Instagram of my weekend last weekend (which you can read more about here). I walked about eleven miles on Saturday, wandering up to Lincoln Center to see Avengers 2: Age of Ultron and stopped into the Strand bookstore to pick up this Hyperbole and a Half/ Allie Brosh print.

Someday I might get tired of New York City, but for now, there is still so much for me to do on my mile-long to do/to eat/to see list, that I know I’m not going anywhere any time soon (talk to me in 2020, we’ll see where I’m at then).

My Must-Have iPhone Apps (that go beyond Mint and Starbucks)

Since moving to New York City a few months ago, I have added a lot of apps. It helps that my iPhone 6 is still relatively new, and when I transferred everything from my iPhone 5, I cleaned it up – deleting the apps I downloaded, opened once then never opened again. Now I have plenty of room to stock up on the latest and greatest in the App world.

I’ve been talking with a few people about the apps on my phone, such as the essentials for 20-something in New York City, to-do/productivity apps, and HopStop. It got me thinking about the relatively new apps that have proven to be invaluable to me.

Quick note about productivity apps: I think there’s a difference between having your thoughts and to-do’s organized in one list (Wunderlist!!) and having a productivity app that says “you spent 15 minutes doing this activity, time to move on.” The former is a great way to make sure you don’t forget any important tasks while the latter – and I’ve tried many apps like this – wastes your time input that kind of data when you could have already completed the task at hand.

purebarreapp Pure Barre: I love Pure Barre. My obsession with Soul Cycle is well-documented, but cardio recently has proved downright exhausting. I want to work my muscles in a different way and PB lets me do that through various strength training exercises. Three classes in the past week, I already notice my posture is better throughout the day, and I’m not holding my stress in my shoulders.

This app lets me manage the classes I’m signed up for, and the classes I’m on the waitlists for, and sign up for more classes in a completely streamlined way. It’s simple, because it can be – no need for a million different widgets. Bonus: you can see what position you’re in on the waitlists. I’m next in line for the 6:10am class next week!

hopstopapp HopStop: Moving to New York City, I’ve had to combat some fears. One of them being the subway – for no particularly reason beyond I find it intimidating – but this app makes it dummy-proof. Input your actual start and ending locations and it will tell you where and when to get the subway and how much walking (distance and time) it’ll take. As someone who’s paranoia runs high when it comes to traveling (I double-, triple-check I’m getting on the right bus/train, going in the right direction, every time I get on a means of transportation. I even re-verify with Uber drivers.)

overcastapp Overcast: I already talked about this a few days ago. Love it. Need it. Live it. Here’s what I had to say about it: “We all know the pre-installed Podcast app from Apple is not the greatest. Heck, it’s not even good. So, I coughed over the $1.99 or whatever it was to buy Overcast. You can get the free version, but the paid one is so much better. I put the speed level at 1.2x, just fast enough where I feel like there’s no long pauses, but I can still understand people and they don’t sound like chipmunks.”

postmatesapp Postmates: I got a case of water delivered to my apartment at 9 p.m. for $11 – where else in the world can you do that?! (No where else I’ve lived, I’ll tell you that.) Admittedly I haven’t used it for anything beyond this one time, but oh man does it seem promising. Allegedly it works virtually all hours of the night, but there’s humans on the other side of the delivery requests and sometimes it doesn’t beat being in-store yourself. If there’s not an item in stock at say, the Duane Reade you’re ordering from, there are some options – such as pick a close substitute or leave out the item, but like this feature, Postmates won’t replace real in-store shopping.

flavourapp Flavour: I like to eat a lot. I want to make sure the food I eat is good. While Yelp is still a go-to, I love Flavour for it’s easily customizable map of restaurants. You can categorize the search by neighborhood, cuisine, and/or the real standout: features. Under Features, there’s options like “brunch,” “dine at the bar,” “no reservations,” “rooftop,” or “burger,” filtering restaurants that are known for your selection. Search the results and get the price range, hours of operation, ‘notable dishes,’ ‘best for,’ the place’s number and a link to their menu. It’s a powerful little app that I use almost daily.

overdriveapp Overdrive: The NYPL has a huge, robust e-book catalogue and I love being able to read them wherever I go. I hooked it up to my Kindle, and with this app, I have all of my checked-out books and audiobooks at my finger-tips. Free books that I don’t need to leave my apartment to get? Yes. Please! Overdrive does, however, quite possibly have the most corporate-looking app image, but it’s more like a handy little tool in the toolbox than a spiffy show-off of a hammer or something.

What apps are on your must-have list?

How I Finally Got Into Podcasts (Hint: Big thanks to ‘Children of Tendu’)

In a first-time event, I’ve posted the same post on this channel and on the website I’m starting to use again, &NY, so if you want to read it over there for comparison’s sake, no one is stopping you.

I’ve never been a huge podcast listener. I a problem with audiobooks and podcasts – I find it hard to follow the story unless the podcast format is distinctly roundtable/Q&A. Up until now, the only podcast I (not even regularly) listened to was the Nerdist Writers Panel.

I can’t listen to them while I’m futzing around on the computer like I can with music because my brain freaks out and tries to pay attention to what I’m hearing and what I’m reading on the screen and it doesn’t end well. (Yes. I did listen to Serial. I would play it every Friday morning when I was working out. No, that still wasn’t enough to get me into podcasts.)


Image via: Children of Tendu tumblr 

That’s all changed thanks to Children of Tendu. The podcast is the most in-depth look at television production I’ve ever stumbled upon. It’s more than ‘how to write a television script’ and more than a synopsis of ‘what a television writer does’. They take you through every single step in one “season” (13 90-minute episodes). I’ve searched the different TV production roles online before and have come up with barely scraps of information. These guys spend three freaking hours talking about every kind of producer credit in television.

It’s hard to quantify how valuable the information the two hosts, Javi Grillo-Marxuach (@OKBJGM) and Jose Molina (@josemolinatv), have freely given to their thousands of listeners. Does that make it all simply, invaluable? It probably should.

Walking around New York City though has been a fantastic time to listen to these podcast episodes. I walked 10 miles last Saturday and listened to a few hours of podcasts, and I enjoyed every moment of it. Learning what a staff writer does – but taking a step back and learning what a writer’s assistant, or how to even become ‘staffed’ or get an agent – is straight up pure enjoyment for me.

I don’t know why I resisted podcasts for so long. I love listening/reading/watching interviews with my favorite people (Grace Helbig, many of the Daily Show correspondents, television showrunners and writers). These podcasts are literally dedicated to giving me that material. An hour and a half podcast with Chris Hardwick and Grace? YES! A roundtable with writers like B.J. Novak or the Better Call Saul writers? PLEASE!

To think, while I spent all those hours meandering around Penn State’s campus for three and a half years, I could have been listening to so many more podcasts.




For now, I have Children of Tendu until I run out of episodes – I’m trying to pace myself with the last few – The Daily Show Podcast Without Jon Stewart; Currently (co-hosted by Hypafriend, John Thrasher!); Nerdist with Chris Hardwick and Girl on Guy with Aisha Tyler. I also have randomly added Stuff You Should Know (how does anesthesia work?), Comedy Bang Bang: The Podcast, and You Tell It! to get my education/comedy bases covered.

An important part of my podcast obsession has been the app I use. We all know the pre-installed Podcast app from Apple is not the greatest. Heck, it’s not even good. So, I coughed over the $1.99 or whatever it was to buy Overcast. You can get the free version, but the paid one is so much better. I put the speed level at 1.2x, just fast enough where I feel like there’s no long pauses, but I can still understand people and they don’t sound like chipmunks.

So, if you have any good podcast recommendations, please send them my way. I’m into any topic and am thinking of going educational for my next few. I tried giving Welcome to Night Vale a listen but found it to be too much.

When working doesn’t feel like ‘work’

Maybe it was because my Monday at work-work was great – the day flew by – or because with every passing day I get more and more excited for Upfronts next month, but writing about television doesn’t feel like work to me. Analyzing ratings and talking about its implications are so much fun for me. 

I’ve gotten a second wind tonight and have cranked out 500 words about May sweeps – and I haven’t even gotten to my point. Sure, this means it’ll require a ton of edits, but that’s why our lovely editors work with us. There’s something purely liberating and freeing about talking about television. Maybe it’s the way millions of Americans use it to unwind from work, and I’m purposely choosing to devote time to working in and for it. And then it hits me again, as it has tons of times before, this is what I’m supposed to be doing with my life. 

Sure, it’s the middle of April, the long stretch before the millions of finales (oddly, thankfully, I’ve had time to recharge my batteries as all three of my shows have been on hiatus for a month), but I’m still finding joy in doing this. It’s my second job, one that I want to recommit myself to focusing on. 

If only all aspects of my life were as easy as that lightbulb that goes off when I write a lede. “Oh, I still love writing. All my skills didn’t fly out the window overnight.” 

In the meantime, I continue to neglet other passion projects. It’s easier to think of these grand blogging plans, than to actually execute them. At least I’ve been getting to use my iPad Bluetooth keyboard for a while tonight.